Demonstration Session

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

11:30am – 12:30pm

Jon Wilcox, Beekeeper Group

If a picture tells a thousand words, what do you glean from an infographic? This masterclass will show you how to create your own infographic from scratch using a realworld advocacy issue to create a compelling creative asset.

Have feedback on this session? We’d love to hear it! Submit it here.

What is an Infographic?

  • Most know it as a long-form text graphic
  • To make an infographic, take something text heavy and turn it into something more readable.
  • The goal of an infographic is to simplify chaotic information and get your message across to a new or broader audience.
  • A key part of creating an infographic is culling down large amounts of data to one specific message.
  • “Graphics reveal data” – Edward Tufte, author of Information Design

A Brief History

  • It all starts with cave paintings. People showed things that matter in their lives in a primitive way.
  • Alphabetical and logographic. The start of iconography.
  • William Playfair: Invented line graphs, bar graphs, pie charts.
  • Florence Nightingale – Invented the coxcomb or radial graphics.
  • Otl Aicher – Innovator for Iconography in the 1972 Olympic Games, art still used in public signage today.
  • Today: Present information clearly, tell a story, connect with our audiences, educate or change opinions, and compel readers to action
  • Example: Public Affairs Council Grassroots Conference Infographic

Infographic ‘Ingredients’

  • Data or a narrative: need to know what you’re telling and how you will tell it. You need the best data and the data that will get you to the goal of the information presentation.
  • Design style: serious? Fun? Somber?
  • Brand Reqs: Logo, Branding Colors, Website
  • Format Specss: How will it be used and where? What size?
  • Desired Timeline: Need to be strategic and understand that culling down data takes time.

Graphic Design 101

  • Color
    • Sets the mood, reinforces branding and creates a comfortable reading experience.
    • Color has connotations: Things that everyone understands.
    • From the audience: Red means stop, fear, anger, danger
    • OSHA Safety Color System: Color system for public communication
    • Orange: Dangerous, Machinery
    • Yellow: Physical Hazard
    • Green: First Aid
    • Blue: Caution
    • Purple: Radiation
    • Color can carry a lot of impact; keep color in mind in order to set the right tone for your information.
  • Composition
    • How you lay out the information
    • Flow is important
    • White space helps to control and influence how to guide the reader’s eye.
  • Gestalt
    • Helps explain how people digest the content in our world.
    • Principles of perception, helps to understand how people’s brains fill in the gaps.
    • Example: World Wild Life Fund Logo
    • Sidenote: Logos should be quickly recognizable and easily replicated or rendered in different ways.
    • Do not rely on the brain’s ability to fill in the gaps only, be strategic about making the message and goal clear while creating infographics
  • CRAP – Contrast, Repetition, Align, Proximity
    • Contrast – makes elements different to increase understanding. Light/Dark
    • Repetition – Show the same icon to show magnitude
    • Alignment – white space, logical layouts
    • Proximity – if you’re talking about similar things, keep them grouped together before moving to another section. Keep things in bite-sized chunks.
  • Imagery: Iconography
    • Most infographics are based on these icons
    • Example: American Intenration Automobile Dealers Global Automakers
  • Illustration
    • More customized version of infographics, better for more freedom in style,
    • Example: Lilly Halloween
  • Photography
    • Feeling of authenticity and real-life, identifiable
    • Seafood is Lifesaving Infographic
  • Infographic Design Process
    • All the steps necessary to complete to
    • Case Study: Energy Infographic
    • Start with a data set.
    • Identify the most important parts
      • For this example, cut two pages of information to a single page document complete with the proposed layout of the information for the infographic. Include the information pieces along with the proposed ideas for graphic rendering/illustration of those pieces.
    • After approval/collaboration, move into the art creation.
    • Sketch out the pieces of information along with the visual representation.
      • If you’re animating the infographic, make sure the static version of the infographic is completed before moving into animation.
      • Side note: It is important to receive approval and go-ahead for each part of the infographic creation process. You want to make sure that everyone is on the same page before moving into the art creation. It is important to see the whole infographic creation process is a collaboration. Include the experts, providers of the data, throughout the process in order to create a quality infographic.
      • It is better to show more during the process than less.
    • After your receive approval for the sketches, move into the full design, pre-final artwork. Now is the time to add the colors, real icons into the infographic.
    • Make sure that the piece has a whole reflects the organization’s branding and organizational style.
    • After the full design is completed, review the infographic with all of the stakeholders on the team. Once you receive the feedback, compile it together and make sure everyone signs off before editing the final version of the infographic.
      • Note for additional uses: When you create an infographic, do not think of it as just a static infographic. Think about other channels that you can utilize to present the information. Possible additional uses: Social, Email, Website, Animation.
    • Tools of the Trade:
      • DIY Free
        • Icon sets: flaticon.com
      • Data Vis Tools
        • ly
        • com
      • Fonts
        • com/fonts
      • Image Editors
        • com
        • org
      • Paid
        • Stock Photo
          • com
          • com
        • Website Templates
          • net
          • com
        • Image Editing Software
          • Adobe Creative Suite/Cloud
        • Building a Visual Content Strategy
          • Video Animation –
          • Leave Behinds – Printouts, Conference Materials, Print
          • Branded Items – Shirts, other swag
          • Paid Advertising
          • Social Graphics – Sizing pieces of the infographic for social platforms.
          • Responsive Web Experiences – Think of the pieces that you can pull for the site.
          • Mapping – Shows the reach of a campaign, also useful on interactive mapping campaigns for showing interesting information
        • Infographic of Infographics – Ivan Cash
      • Don’ts
        • No data
        • Too much data
        • Unclear message
        • Confusing layout or overly complex design
        • Working against the clock – use a realistic timeline
      • Do’s
        • Clear goal and message
        • Focus on the important data
        • Tell a story
        • Go for clean, compelling design
        • Consider your brand
        • Think beyond the long-form static graphic (consider other iterations)